Thoughts on Ex Machina: The Great Machine

When I first laid my eyes on Ex Machina, I figured since its a comic about a superhero it should be interesting. Mostly what I found to be interesting in this comic would be the amazing powers Mitchell Hundred had gotten. I found it pretty cool and useful that he can control electronic devices and things around him. I would have to say Ex Machina was quite confusing at parts. I found myself reading pages over to understand what I had just read a little better. There are still some parts I am confused with such as why would a teenager murder two snowplow drivers. All the statements Hundred said about Kremlin being the criminal made much more sense to me than a teenager. What I would love to know is what had stopped Hundred from continuing to be the Great Machine?! I was hoping for a few clues in this volume of the comic but not much came to mind. My only guess would be maybe he witnessed a death or lost someone very close to him. To me, this comic was ok, I’m not saying I didn’t completely enjoy this comic because there were some parts where I would find myself smiling towards a funny comment a character would say, my only problem was I was confused a lot ! If I continue to read more issues of this comic maybe my questions and confusion would be cleared up there.

– Michelene J.

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2 thoughts on “Thoughts on Ex Machina: The Great Machine

  1. I had the same thoughts. Initially I thought it would be a good and interesting read being about a real (according to the comic, of course) superhero in New York City. But I got easily confused with the flash backs and trying to figure out what the main plot was or if the different plots would end up to be related somehow. Hundred’s ability also seemed pretty handy and was confused why he got in trouble for using it when someone tried to kill him. I don’t understand why he wasn’t allowed to talk about it or use it. I understand how he wasn’t the best superhero and made people angry but that shouldn’t mean stop using it.
    I also may have missed something, but why was Kremlin not in the group anymore? He knew Mitchell since he was a boy and was a father figure to him so I don’t understand why they were being so cruel to him. I have to admit, it was pretty sad to see the little tear in the corner of his eye in the end. It definitely was a sudden twist to have the killer be a high school boy but they went into zero detail about that and I just thought it was a bad way to end the book. What I did like is in the end when they had pictures of the “cast” and how they created the comic. That was pretty interesting.

  2. While reading Ex Machina, I also was confused. The flashbacks sort of made me go back and look at what I previously read. I agree with your statement saying that the highlight of the book that made it interesting was Mayor Mitchell Hundred’s Powers. I wonder to myself how an individual can be the mayor of New York City and a super hero in his spare time. I’m guessing he isn’t doing so well with the ladies because from what I read, I don’t remember seeing him with a lady of interest in the first volume. A couple of questions come to mind after reading the comic that are still a mystery to me. One is like how did Mayor Mitchell Hundred get his powers. Did he get it from the explosion in the water or was he born with them, the comic doesn’t really specify what or how he got his powers. Another question is why he decided to use his power for the good of the city when he’s capable of being the ruler of the world with such unique “talent”. Another question is what exactly is his relationship with Kremlin? It appears like he was a colleague of his mother that grew a bond with him from a young age. Or is he possibly Mitchell Hundreds Father? They never discussed his father in the first volume or at least not to my knowledge. I’m guessing this was purposely done for us to stay tuned though the comic series for our questions to be answered.

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